my life as a sketchbook

I have hidden in a sketchbook and a journal all my life. Time to open the books, reframe the story & time. Copyright Cinders McLeod. All rights reserved

in pre-dogpoo-bags days, i got tired of stepping in it. shame there aren’t politician-poo bags

It is a thought…that one new year, a government may say – you’re not allowed in. On second thought, that’s not a new thought

When my son Diarmid was  four, I took him to The Scottish National Party annual conference in Rothesay on the Isle of Bute, where we lived. After, in the tea room, Salmond sat down at our table, and chatted with Diarmid. The cameras loved it. I loved it. A short time later when I was delivering a cartoon in the Herald Lobby, lo – Mr Salmond. We talked, I was awed, I came home and (half) self-mockingly drew this cartoon

Broomie Law is an anti-bullying cartoon. Any good political cartoon is an anti-bullying cartoon.

Broomie Law is an anti-bullying cartoon. Any good political cartoon is an anti-bullying cartoon.

   
For the last couple of years, I’ve been drawing a cartoon to accompany the Globe and Mail’s Nine to Five column. Nine to Five is the Anne Launders of the business world. Workers write in their woes, and experts advise. I love drawing this cartoon for I recognize, and empathize, with most of their injustices. Some, I’ve experienced, and in the face of indifference. My Nine to Five drawings are my way of fighting back, of not being a victim or a bystander.

For the last couple of years, I’ve been drawing a cartoon to accompany the Globe and Mail’s Nine to Five column. Nine to Five is the Anne Launders of the business world. Workers write in their woes, and experts advise. I love drawing this cartoon for I recognize, and empathize, with most of their injustices. Some, I’ve experienced, and in the face of indifference. My Nine to Five drawings are my way of fighting back, of not being a victim or a bystander.

Like Shane, writing  was my way to escape my real life, and cope with cruelty and indifference too.

My cartoons developed out of these needs, and also the need to expose the cruelty and indifference in the world.

Like Shane, writing  was my way to escape my real life, and cope with cruelty and indifference too.

My cartoons developed out of these needs, and also the need to expose the cruelty and indifference in the world.

Bullying will usually stop within 10 seconds if someone steps in to help the victim

from TO THIS DAY, anti-bullying poem by Shane Koyczan, in Annick Press’s new publication

85% of bullying happens when other kids are watching

from TO THIS DAY, anti-bullying poem by Shane Koyczan, in Annick Press new publication

I can’t remember how old I was when I started writing. I know that I was very young. My grandparents raised me and writing become something that my grandmother always encouraged. Writing was a way to escape my real life, a way to cope with cruelty and indifference. Sometimes even worse than the people who hurt you are the people who don’t care you’re being hurt –the ones who could do something but choose not to. I understand it; sometimes you don’t want to get involved and risk having bullies shift their attention to you. That’s normal…that’s fear. I was afraid a lot when I was growing up.

Shane Koyczan, TO THIS DAY, Annick Press publication


Just like life to assign me the spread in Shane’s anti-bullying poem that evoked an early bully memory in me.

I thanked Paula Ayer of Annick Press for givng me words so close to my heart.

That inspired Paula to include some of the illustrator’s own personal stories about bullying in the book. This is mine:

When I was in grade seven, one of the girls in my class taped a note to the front of my desk that read, “Cindy has a big bum.” I remember first feeling shocked that someone would take the time to be so cruel, and then feeling gutted. Up to that point, I had felt pretty good about my bum. The same girl accused me in front of an audience of wearing bargain basement shoes. The secret was out: I wasn’t one of them.